Rice
FIS

FIS image header
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Download 
Scholarly Interest Report
         
Christopher Hight
Associate Professor
Associate Professor of Architecture
 
e-mail:chight@rice.edu
 
  • M.A. With Distinction Architectural Theory and History (1997) Architectural Association School of Architecture, London
  • B.A. Architecture (1993) Rice University, Houston Texas
  • B. Arch. Architecture (1995) Rice University, Houston, Texas
  • Ph.D. Architecture, Cultural Studies and the Humanities (2003) University of London, London
 
Primary Department
   School of Architecture
Picture
 
Department Affiliations
 
  • Department of Art History
  • Rice Design Alliance
  • Shell Center for Sustainability
  •  
    Websites
     Christopher Hight Faculty Site
     Last Resorts
     hydraulicity
     Arch 346/646
     Arch 504
     arch 504 course wiki
     hydraulicity.org
     Architecture and the City 1
     Principles of Architecture III 2007
     arch 504 2005 Website >> Space for the Multitude!
     Arch 504 2004 Website >> Sheerspace
     
    Research Areas
     History and Theory of Architecture from mid-20th century to the present; ecology & digital processes in contemporary architectural design
     
    General
     My research examines the relationship between information technologies, design practices and emerging social order. Trans-disciplinary in its relating of architecture to science, technology and philosophy, this research has manifested itself as a series of articles and lectures, and soon as a book.
     
    Theoretical and Historical Research
     My historical research focuses on post-World War Two architectural discourses concerning formal and spatial ordering, technology and social organization, hinged upon architectural discipline's oscillation between the organic and mechanistic as sources for theories of such ordering.

    I also examine questions raised by current preoccupations with models of order drawn from nature (e.g., complexity theory, emergence), digital visualization and design tools, and new modes of cultural production (e.g., mass-customization, network practices, branding). I argue they continue, in spite of their rhetoric, to operate in roughly the same space of knowledge. Thus, I not only seek to delineate their epistemological, historical and disciplinary conditions of possibility,but also investigate present possibilities.
     

    Computation

     

    I have sought to develop the implications of this research by writing critical articles about contemporary architectural practices and theoretical texts about related technological, urban, design and social phenomena. I have also organized the Modulations Kennon Symposium as an initial attempt to situate current interests in things like evolutionary theory, complexity/emergence and mass-customization in relationship to the historical conditions of possibility of earlier post-war architecture.

     

    Current Research Statement

     

     


     


     


     


    Research Statement


    February, 2011


     


    Christopher Hight


     


     


    My research critiques the distancing of a humanist conception of design and the precipitation of an ecological design problematic. Rather than simply understand the latter as a normative discourse related to a narrow understanding of “sustainability,” my interest lay in the agency of design in recombining ideas, nature, and social organization. My written research examines this transformation in relation to architectural knowledge and practice between the mid-20th century to the present. I pursue this research in two distinct but related directions, which might be thought of as intensive sites of the body and subjectivity and, secondly, the extensive fields of processes of urbanization. This research is necessarily inter and trans-disciplinary and often probes the limits of the modern divisions between the disciplines of the built environment.


     


    The focus of my first book, Architectural Principles in the Age of Cybernetics, is the heretofore unexplained [am1] post-World War Two irruption of interest in proportioning and scaling systems linked to the body and human figure. Between 1947 and the early 1960s fierce debates occurred across European and American institutions, bestselling books were devoured by students and professional alike, and the rebuilding of post-war cities was informed by such aesthetic discourses. While no lengthy examination of this discourse had been undertaken, it has been frequently referenced by contemporary architects as a return to a Renaissance Humanism. In contrast, I show how the possibility of such a statement and indeed is only possible within a 20th century framework to engage a specifically modern set of problems. More specifically, the interest in proportion attempted to work through modern architecture’s constitutive lack of a theory of form for the subject and to do so (paradoxically) through unstable boundary sites (such as the body) between Nature and Culture. Moreover, it attempted to incorporate existing theories of formal order and meaning derived from art historical and philosophical Neo-Kantianism (e.g., Wittkower, Panofsky, Cassier) with then emerging sciences of ergonomics and cybernetics, constructing an architectural discourse that circulated around the destabilized divisions between human and animal, as well as life and technology. “The Age of Cybernetics” thus refers to Heidegger and Norbert Wiener’s contemporary presentation as an epistemological and ontological threshold, beyond which lay a post-humanist world (one in which bodies and subjects are understood as recursive feedback of information within and across systems). The result is a critical reexamination of humanism and post-humanism in post-war architecture and a richer and complex account of architecture’s modernity.


     


    I have extended this line inquiry in subsequent articles on post-war and contemporary architecture. Recent articles problematize historical and current alignments of architecture to models of order drawn from nature (e.g., complexity theory, emergence, biomimetics, evolutionary theory, etc) and often related to computation and digital design and new models of corporality and innovations in material and fabrication technologies. One of these articles will shortly be published in the multivolume Sage Handbook of Architectural Theory.


     


    I also recently co-edited a reader that attempted to enrich some of these discourses with a framework towards a contemporary understanding of spatial heterogeneity (in contrast to the now dominate emphasis on formal variation, through a threefold strategy: 1) Its compilation of seminal essays on the discourse of heterogeneous space. These include previously published key texts by, for example, Stan Allen, Reyner Banham, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Robin Evans, Jeff Kipnis and Bernard Tschumi, as well as newly commissioned texts; 2) By commenting on these seminal texts and drawing links between them. 3) By principle writing and introduction that attempts to distill a contemporary outlook on a discourse of heterogeneous space that is of future significance.


     


    This past year, I curated an exhibition, Envelop{e}s. This exhibition plays off the double connotation of the envelope in architecture as the external skin of a building, and as a sensorial space that envelops the body, bringing the subject into closer interaction with its environment. The show featured designs that explore new potentials of the architectural surface in both senses through ecological performance. These explorations innovate the architectural envelope not simply to separate domains but as a site for enveloping nature and culture, object and subject, problematizing the boundary of interior and exterior via energy transfer. Rather than flat skins delineating interior from exterior, these architectural envelopes become interfaces, osmotic membranes, responsive reliefs, and negotiated sites of multiplicitous becomings.


    Sustainability in architecture predominately focuses on the external building envelope as the principle site for energy transfer. This concentration on the building envelope seems “natural” because it repeats the ancient metaphor of the building as a body, indeed, as a prosthetic second skin that allows us to exist within a hostile environment. Moreover, the modern development of the idea of the environment was premised on the study of energy and information flows that traverse the corporeal boundary of an organism. The building envelope doubles the embodiment of our senses, taking one form of energy and transforming it into another, both literally (e.g., solar radiation into electricity), territorially (e.g., the relationship of interior to exterior), and architecturally (between of natural phenomena and subjective affects, e.g., natural light becomes an atmosphere). Thus, at its core the exhibit seeks to explore through architecture Jacob von Uexküll’s formulation of the Umwelt as a four sensory envelopes that situate the subject in relation to the environment that is accessible to that subject. In developing a contemporary understanding of the Umwelten between organism and world, we seek a more imaginative and critical understanding of the relationship between architecture, the subject and the environment. The exhibited consisted principally of full-scale mock-ups or prototypes. These examples will not be simple walls, but performative membranes. Often they were literally interactive and responsive. I am currently developing a book length extension of the exhibition.


    The second direction of research into the extensive territories at the intersection of architecture, landscape, urbanism and infrastructure  has also informed my recent studio instruction. As Giorgio Agamben and Hanna Arendt (to name two) have argued, the modern metropolis was the site where the political space of humanism was most clearly articulated. The spaces and forms of architecture refracted this Anthropos through the figuring of political, social and cultural programs and institutions. In that regard it is perhaps not insignificant that the term ecology itself refers to an architectural metaphor. However, today’s technological and socio-political innovations tend to manifest at scales either “smaller” (e.g., material innovations ) or “larger” than a building or even an urban assembly of buildings. In fact, they seem to problematize the scalar categorizations given by the discrete “building” and the “City” as well as the legibility of the anthropomorphism they inscribe. I am working on another book on the relationship of architecture to biopolitics and biotechnology that extends this research and the findings of my previous book.


     


    My graduate and undergraduate studios have investigated the nexus of landscape ecology, development and information technology as an important site for reshaping our knowledge to address the issues of the early 21st century built environment in the way the European metropolis did in the late-19th century. Recent projects were  published this past year in an issue of AD and were exhibited in the Beijing Biennial. I am currently co-editing a book length compendium of this studio based research.


     


    I am also working on a book chapter and wrote the afterwards for an edition of Pamphlet along such themes. I also collaborated with the SSPEED center and other researchers at Rice  in developing a pending interscholastic NSF grant ($250,000-$500,000 for five years) that would examines the constant dynamic of movement and interplay between human and natural systems. I might also mention that this research has also been important in my recent formulation of three RDA Lecture series, as well as service to the University.


     


     






     [am1]  My book project, for example, provides an archaeology of the possibilities of post-humanist architecture, gathered from debates [as varied as] rebuilding European war-torn cities and the latest [in] digital architectures. 




     
    Entanglements
     My research addresses a shift from a humanist conception of architecture to an ecological framework. Rather than understand the latter as a normative discourse related to “sustainability,” my interest lay in the agency of design in creating new formations that traverse what Gregory Bateson and others have described as three interdependent ecologies of ideas, of nature, and of the social. My research examines this transformation in relation to architectural knowledge and practice between the mid-20th century to the present. Therefore, I consider my research as rigorous theoretical work that draws on architectural history to engage issues that shape contemporary design practice. I pursue this research in two distinct but related directions, which might be thought of as intensive sites of the body and subjectivity and, secondly, the extensive fields of populations and landscapes. This research is necessarily trans-disciplinary, relating problems of the architectural discipline to science and technology, philosophy and theory. Similarly, my research problematizes the modern divisions between the disciplines of the built environment.

    To understand what is at stake in these transformations one must better understand the discipline’s historicity and epistemology in modernity. Therefore, the core of my research focuses on the post-war architectural discourses of order, representation and subjectivity. The focus of my first book, Architectural Principles in the Age of Cybernetics, is the heretofore unexplained post-World War Two irruption of interest in proportioning and scaling systems linked to the body and human figure. Between 1947 and the early 1960s fierce debates occurred across European and American institutions, bestselling books were devoured by students and professional alike, and the rebuilding of post-war cities was informed by such aesthetic discourses. Until now this re-emergence has been regarded as a return to a Renaissance Humanism. In contrast, I argue that, while that tradition appears to be historical our understanding of it was a construction of 20th century discourses on proportion in order to engage a specifically modern set of problems. More specifically, the interest in proportion attempted to work through modern architecture’s constitutive lack of a theory of form for the subject and to do so (paradoxically) through unstable boundary sites (such as the body) between Nature and Culture. Moreover, it attempted to incorporate existing theories of formal order and meaning derived from art historical and philosophical Neo-Kantianism (e.g., Wittkower, Panofsky, Cassier) with then emerging sciences of ergonomics and cybernetics, constructing an architectural discourse that circulated around the destablized divisions between human and animal, as well as life and technology. “The Age of Cybernetics” thus refers to Heidegger and Norbert Wiener’s contemporary presentation as an epistemological and ontological transformation into a post-humanist world (one in which bodies and subjects are understood as recursive feedback of information within and across systems). Thus the play of my title off Wittkower's book, Architectural Principles in the Age of Humanism. The result is a critical reexamination of humanism and post-humanism in post-war architecture and a richer and complex account of architecture’s modernity.

    This research is important not only for the sake of historical and theoretical understanding of the architectural field and its relationship to other areas of knowledge in modernity, but also a pragmatic concern for contemporary design, when corporality is a radical site of technological, social and political innovation. For example, my book and distinct articles problematizes historical and current alignments of architecture to models of order drawn from nature (e.g., complexity theory, emergence). In fact, I demonstrate how much of contemporary design continues to operate with a similar topography of thought as the mid-century discourses of proportion. This is not to say that nothing has changed but rather to understand better the specificity of those changes, the conditions of the present and critical projections for development of the field.

    I have developed the implications of this research by writing critical articles about contemporary architectural practices concerning digital design, new models of corporality and innovations in material and fabrication technologies. While much attention has been focused upon the influence of digital media on architectural form-making and technique, little has examined its far broader implications for architectural practice. In that regard, I have researched and published on newly emerging agencies of design in two areas. Firstly, I have examined how communication networks and economies of so-called globalization present challenges and opportunities for reforming the legal and cultural remit of the architect. Constellations of experimental, international, and cross-disciplinary, decentralized, collaborative organizations are now emerging, repositioning architecture to engage unconventional problems, briefs, clients, and manufacturing processes. Secondly, in related terms I have examined digital design practice in relationship to new material and construction technologies vis a vis changing agency of the architect.

    This line of inquiry couples with my teaching at Rice in my second, more recent, tack of research into the extensive territories defined at the interaction of ecology, urbanism and infrastructure. In addition to a set of published articles, I am working on a second book on the relationship between biology, ecology, and architecture. As an example of an issue that would benefit from greater theoretical and historical examination, LEED certification naturalizes modernist concepts of interiority by making the building envelope the primary site for regulation of energy transfer. However well intentioned, this literally naturalizes the metaphor of the building as an organism, as well as historically determined political boundaries, re-investing through heat exchange the role of building skin as a regulatory membrane between the private and public realms it helps to construct through its design. In that regard it is perhaps not insignificant that the term ecology itself refers to an architectural metaphor (Ökologie, or the science of the household of nature). What can the sophisticated spatial understandings of architecture bring to these discussions beyond technical solutions?

    These ongoing theoretical inquires created the opportunity for my recent design research. I recently led a design research project executed under the auspices of the Rice Building Institute with the Harris County Flood Control on strategies that seek to urbanize the Bayous. Seriously confronting the problem of flooding in Houston requires fundamentally rethinking the built environment as a complex, highly interdependent dynamical system wherein design decisions made on the most local of scales can have an emergent effect on global processes. It was not enough to deploy models and metaphors of ecology to produce a design process; we needed to use design as way of fostering ecological complexity between the technical, natural and cultural agencies operating along the bayou’s length. At the same time, the design needed to offer a figure for these relationships in order to make these dynamics available to the public and thus a point of political and civic engagement. We needed to enrich the relationship between city, nature and infrastructure, to turn the edge of the Bayou into an interface for entanglements of nature-culture. The result is design project, an academic article, and a public website (www. hydraulicity.org) through which we hope to generate awareness of the possibilities and issues of flood risk and management in Houston. This work does not simply apply many of the ideas I have researched in articles and books, but also tested and developed them. The design research my studios have undertaken on the political ecology of coastal development have operated in a similarly recursive manner.
    I plan to pursue more such design research projects in the future, where rigorous academic research encounters pressing and pragmatic issues of the contemporary environment. I also hope to pursue outside funding for such research. Many such issues do not have ready answers, or we should be critical of apparent solutions. At the same time, as I have argued, they often elude the conventional delineations of practice and knowledge. Therefore, university based research is ideally situated to investigate these areas by innovation the nature of our disciplinarily inquiry. The precipitation of educational and professional institutions of architecture in the 19th century was oriented around issues of European industrialization and urbanization as well as modern epistemology and aesthetics. As Giorgio Agamben and Hanna Arendt (to name two) have argued, the modern metropolis was the site where the political space of humanism was most clearly articulated. The spaces and forms of architecture refracted this Anthropos through the figuring of political, social and cultural programs and institutions. However, today’s technological and socio-political innovations tend to manifest at scales either “smaller” (e.g., material innovations ) or “larger” than a building or an urban assembly of buildings (e.g., ecological forces). In fact, they seem to escape the scalar categorizations given by the discrete “building” as a normative object of architectural knowledge as well as the anthropomorphism it inscribes. Because our field was calibrated to the modern metropolis we tend to see only an entropic erosion of that model rather than perhaps the emergence of other orderings (e.g., ‘”sprawl”). Indeed, the often immaterial and diffused contours of our contemporary environment are not readily investigated with a repertoire of concepts and tools developed between the late-18th and mid-20th century. That is, they tend to elude the conventional expertise of the architect while offering potentially important sites for innovation of the discipline and its relevance. To engage them we need to deterritoriaize the historical boundaries of knowledge by advancing architectural expertise by projecting it into new contexts. This recursive innovation requires moving from metaphors of architecture as a “body of knowledge” to an approach to understandin design as an ecology of concepts, practices and objects that traverses locale knowledges.
     
    Teaching Areas
     Architectural Design and Theory
     
    Selected Publications
     Abstracts
     Christopher Hight. “Meeting the New Boss: after the Death of Theory,” AD: Theoretical Meltdown, Autumn 2008.
     
     Refereed articles
     

    Christopher Hight. “One Step Towards an Ecology of Design: Fields of Relations and Bodies of Knowledge”, Design Innovation for the Built Environment - Research by Design and the Renovation of Practices. New York/London: Routledge Press. In revision, 2011.

     
     

    Christopher Hight. “Manners of Working: architectural tactics of subterfuge and evasion in digital design,” Handbook of Contemporary Architectural Theory, G. Crysler, S. Cairns, H. Heynen, editors; D. Solomon, D. Cuff, section editors. London: Sage Publications. In press, 2010.Peer Reviewed

     
     Christopher Hight. “Re-born on the Bayou: envisioning the Hydrauli_city,” Praxis 10: Urban Matters. In press, Summer, 2008
     
     

    Christopher Hight "Fabricating Representation." Contemporary Architectural Theory (2009) In Revision

     
     

    Christopher Hight, Chris Perry "After Globalization: architecture at the end of the world." Perspecta, 38

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Inertia and interiority: 24 as a case study of the televisual metropolis." Journal of Architecture, Vol 9, No 3 (Aug 2004) : 369-384.

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Architecture After Capitalism." Praxis, 5 (2003)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Stereo-types: digital coding and the operations of sound in regimes of identification." Leonardo, 36/1 (2003)

     
     Articles
     

    Christopher Hight, Michael Robinson. “Figures in the Sand.” AD: PostTraumatic Urbanism.” Vol 80, No 5. Septermber/October 2010.

     
     Christopher Hight. “Op Ed: At Your Service: alternative models of practice in architecture,” Journal of Architectural Education, Autumn 2008.
     
     

    Christopher Hight, Chris Petty "Introduction." Collective Intellegence in Design (September/October, 2006) : 5-9.

     
     

    Michael Hardt, Christopher Hight "Designing Commonspaces: Interview with Michael Hardt on the Multitude and Collective Intellegence." Collective Intellegence in Design (September/October, 2006) : 70-73.

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Preface to the Multitude: the return to the network practice in Architecture." AKAD 01

     
     

    Christopher Hight "The Pabulum of Place: recent campus architecture the University of St. Thomas and Illinois Institute of Technology." CITE

     
     

    Christopher Hight, Sean Lally "Hyrdotopographic Horizon." Cite (2005)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Laboratory Lifeworlds: computation and unprincipled design teaching." Architecture Review Australia: Digital Architectures, 90 (2004) : 60-63.

     
     

    Christopher Hight "servo's non-object oriented urbanisms." A+U, 405 (June 2004) : 66-67.

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Practice Profile of OCEAN North." AD: Architectural Design, 72/4 (2002)

     
     Books
     

    Christopher Hight, John Anderson, Michael Robinson, editors. Last Resorts: strategies for sustainable coastal development. 2011

     
     Christopher Hight. Architectural Principles in the Age of Cybernetics. New York/London: Routledge Press, 2008.
     
     

    Christopher Hight "Architectural Principles in the Age of Cybernetics."  (2008)

     
     Editor of books
     

    Christopher Hight, Michael Robinson. RE:mediations: design research of an undergraduate design studio. Rice School of Architecture, 2010.

     
     

    Christopher Hight, Michael Hensel, Achim Menges, editors. Space Reader: Heterogeneous Space in Architecture. London: Wiley-Academy, 2009.

     
     Christopher Hight, Michael Hensel, Achim Menges, editors. Heterogeneous Space: A reader. London: Wiley-Academy, January, 2009.
     
     

    "Collective Intelligence In Design." AD (Architecture & Design) (September/October, 2006)

     
     

    "Heterogeneous Space Reader."  (2009)

     
     Book chapters
     

    Christopher Hight, “Designing Ecologies,” Projective Ecologies, Chris Reed, Nina-Marie Lister, Editors, Harvard Graduate School of Design, 2014.

     
     

    Christopher Hight. “Manners of Working: architectural tactics of subterfuge and evasion in digital design,” Handbook of Contemporary Architectural Theory, G. Crysler, S. Cairns, H. Heynen, editors; D. Solomon, D. Cuff, section editors. London: Sage Publications,  2012.

     
     

    Christopher Hight. “One Step Towards an Ecology of Design: Fields of Relations and Bodies of Knowledge,” Design Innovation for the Built Environment - Research by Design and the Renovation of Practices. London: Wiley and Sons, 2012.

     
     

    Christopher Hight, Chris Perry, “Collective Intelligence in Design,” The Digital Turn in Architecture 1992-2012, M. Carpo Editor,  London/New York: John Wiley and Sons, 2013. Republication of an article within a reader.

     
     

    Christopher Hight. "High Performance Anxiety," Performalism. Y. Grobman, E. Neuman, eds. London/New York: Routledge, 2012.

     
     Christopher Hight. “Manifest Variations,” Parametric Prototypes: New Computational Paradigms in Architecture. T. Verebes, ed. China: Department of Architecture, Xi'an Jiaotong, 2012.
     
     

    Christopher Hight. “Inaesthetics of Design (working title)”  Cycles: Observations and Strategies for Environmental Design. Liam O'Brien, ed., ACTAR Press. In Revision.

     
     

    Christopher Hight. “Afterwards: Figuring it Out.” Pamphlet Architecture 30: Coupling. Mason White, Lola Sheppard, Neeraj Bhatia, Maya Przybylski. Princeton Architectural Press, 2011

     
     

    Christopher Hight. “Manifest Variations,” Parametric Prototypes. China, 2010.

     
     

    Christopher Hight. “The Moire Affect in Architecture.” Research & Design: The Architecture of Variation. London: Thames and Hudson, 2009.

     
     Christopher Hight. "Manners of Working: architectural tactics of subterfuge and evasion in digital design,"; Handbook of Contemporary Architectural Theory, G. Crysler, S. Cairns, H. Heynen, editors; D. Solomon, D. Cuff, section editors. London: Sage Publications, 2009.
     
     Christopher Hight. "Spaces of Envelopment," DD 27: Networks and Environments, servo. Korea, 2008.
     
     Christopher Hight. “Pervasive intimacy: The Unité d’Habitation and Golden Lane as instruments of postwar domesticity,” Intimate Metropolis. London/New York: Routledge, 2008.
     
     

    Christopher Hight "Against Pedagogy:We Have NOTHING to Teach You!." DRL 10 (2008)

     
     Christopher Hight, “Introduction: Enroute: towards a theory of heterogeneous space in architecture,” Christopher Hight, Michael Hensel, Achim Menges, editors. Heterogeneous Space: A reader. London: Wiley-Academy, In press, publication February 2009.
     
     

    Christopher Hight "Against Pedagogy: “We Have NOTHING to Teach You!”." DRL 10 (2008) In Revision

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Commentary on Aggregate 02 Modulations Project." Morphoecologies (2006) : 274-285.

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Commentary on Discontinuous Strut Lattices." Morphoecologies (2006) : 112-121.

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Inconvenient Projections: design research of the Rice School of Architecture." Beijing Biennial 2006: Emerging Talents, Emerging Technologies: Students (2006)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Moiré Affects: epistemologies of measure, order and differentiation." Morphoecologies (2006) : 345-367.

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Pervasive Intimacy." Intimate Metropolis (2008) In Revision

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Putting out the Fire with Gasoline: parables of entropy and homeostasis from the second machine age from the second information age to the information age." Softspace: from a representation of form to a simulation of space (2007) : 1-23.

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Scalar Networks, Super Creeps: Approaching the non-Standard in the architecture of servo." Network Practices: New Strategies in Architecture and Design (2007)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Spaces of Envelopment." DD: Monograph on the architectural firm Servo (2008) In Revision

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Teratogenic Territories Of Oikonomia." Gen[h]om (2006)

     
     

    Christopher Hight, Michael Robinson "Phase Shifting: Research of the Rice School of Architecture in Environmental Design ." States of Change (2008) In Press

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Oxymoronic Method: design research as an epistemological practice." Corporate Fields: the work of the AA-Design Research Laboratory (London)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Computations of a Monstrous Field: the installations designs of Evan Douglis Associates." Monograph of Evan Douglis Associates Work (2005) In Revision

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Area Denial Technologies." Row: tragectories through the shotgun house (2004) : 198-203.

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Breakspotting: Signs of Modernity, Surfaces of Becoming." Signs as Surfaces (2004) : 10-21.

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Portraying the urban landscape: landscape in architectural criticism and theory, 1960 to present." Landscape Urbanism (2003)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Bleeding Edges: space beyond the machine and organism." DO: the space of extremes (2002)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Subjects, Boundaries, Negotiations." Negotiate my boundary: mass-customisation and responsive environments (2002)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Yahoo-topia: architecture at the end, of history?." Latent Utopias: experiments within contemporary architecture (2002)

     
     Book reviews
     

    Christopher Hight "Architecture, Animal, Human: The Asymmetrical Condition by Catherine Ingraham." The Journal of Architecture, 12 (Feb., 2007) : 115-119.

     
     Refereed conference papers
     Refereed Conference Paper. “Hydrauli_city: a project on infrastructure, ecology and urbanization,” ACAIDIA 2008: Biological Processed and Computation, October, 2008
     
     

    Christopher Hight "From Atelier to Laboratory: Architectural Education in the 21st Century as Model for integrative learning”."  (Jan., 2007)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Unities and Networks of Golden Lanes." Intimate Metropolis Symposium (2003)

     
     

    Christopher Hight, Chris Perry "bionetworks: distributed forms of architectural practice." ACSA National Conference (March 2004)

     
     

    christopher hight "Reeltime Urbanism." Society of Architectural Historians, Annual Conference (2004)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "The art of engineering after truth and beauty." ASCA International Conference (2003)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Unities and Golden Lanes: from corporeal to network organziation in the post-war city." Architectural Association (2003)

     
     Conference papers
     

    Christopher Hight "Urban Moires: a field theory of components."  (March, 2007)

     
     

    Natalia Beard, Christopher Hight, "Presentation of a Master's Thesis on replanning New Orleans."  (November 1-2, 2007)

     
     

    "Introduction and Moderator."  (April, 2007)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Measuring Affect."  (London)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Desiring Landscape."  (Porto, Portugal)

     
     

    Christopher Hight "Modulations of Nature and Culture."  (Houston)

     
     Other
     

    Christopher Hight. Statement and Description of Student Work in Machinic Processes: Architecture Biennial Beijing 2010. N. Leach, X. Weiguo, eds. Beijing: Tsinghau University/China Architecture and Building Press, 2010. 

     
     

    Christopher Hight, et. al. "A Call to Armature: student work of the Rice School of Architecture, Beijing Biennial Catalogue." 

     
    Creative Works
     Architectural Designs - Brandard Street House Design
     
     
     Group Exhibitions - Student work in Architecture Biennial Beijing 2010
     
     
     Group Exhibitions - Curator. Envelop{e}s
     Muscarelle Museum of Art, College of William and Mary
     
     Group Exhibitions - Curator. Envelop{e}s
     Pratt Manhattan Gallery, New York
     
     Architectural Designs - Hydraulicity
     Landscape Urbanism Design Reaseach and Project, www.hydraulicity.org, Houston (March-August, 2007)
     
    Presentations
     Conference Committee Member
     

    "Engineering Architecture." Rice Design Alliance, Houston. (September, October 2008)

     
     

    "Final Review Juror." Cornell University Department of Architecture,

     
     Invited Papers
     

    Christopher Hight, “Figuring Differentiation: Ecology/Realm 3: Genetic Systems and Non-Standard Modes of (Re)Production,” ACSA 101st Annual Conference: New Constellations, New Ecologies, 21-24 March 2013.

     
     

    Zone d'attente: the airport’s biopoltical infrastructures of Inertia, Airport Landscapes: Urban Ecologies in the Aerial Age, Invited Conference Paper, Harvard Graduate School of Design, November 14-15, 2013.

     
     

    Presenting a lecture.  "Desiring Landscape." Landscape and Architecture: Topology and Tipology; Serralves Foundation, Porto, Portugal. (February 2005)

     
     

    "Architectures of Pattern Recognition." AIA New York and Cooper Union, New York. (September, 2003)

     
     Invited Talks
     

    Christopher Hight, Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies, and John Anderson, W. Maurice Ewing Professor of Oceanography. “Interscholastic research on sustainable urbanism in Coastal Areas” Shell Center of Sustainability conference on Land Use, October 5th, 2010.

     
     Lectures
     

    ""Future Imperfect," Spotlight on Rice University’s School of Architecture at the Glasscock School of Coninuting Studies." (October 2011)

     
     

    "Architectural Principles in the Age of Cybernetics." Cornell University, (March, 2008)

     
     Invited Lecture, “Disaster Capital and Cake Decoration : a biography of a design research project, Hy-drauli_city,” Department of Architecture, Illinois Institute of Technology, March, 2008.
     
     

    "Retooling Practice." Rice Allumni College, Houston, Texas. (March 2006)

     
     

    Presented lecture and organized a conference session on information technology and architectural education.  "From Atelier to the Laboratory." ACSA Administrator?s Conference, Houston, Texas. (October 1, 2004)

     
     

    Presented introductory lecture.  "Modulating History." Modulations, Rice School of Architecture. (15 November 2004)

     
     

    "Reeltime Metropolis." Rice School of Architecture, Houston. (April 2004)

     
     

    "The future of a practice." Architecture 132; John Casbarian, Rice School of Architecture. (April, 2004)

     
     

    gave one lecture as part of a first-year introductory course.  "Architectural Practice in the Information Age." John Casbarian, Houston. (Spring, 2003)

     
     Other
     

    "Final Reviews, California College of the Arts, December 2011."

     
     

    "Final Reviews, Harvard Graduate School of Design, April 2011."

     
     

    "Final Reviews, Harvard Graduate School of Design, Department of Landscape Architecture, May 2011."

     
     

    "Thesis Reviews, Harvard Graduate School of Design, April 2010."

     
     

    "Lecture and seminar session in Kirsten Ostheer's graduate Comparative Studies Seminar." (16 November 2010)

     
     

    "Lecture in Lars Lerup's Graduate seminar on Urbanism." (28 October 2010)

     
     

    "Final Reviews." University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Design, (December, 2007)

     
     

    "Interim Reviews." Cornell University, (March, 2007)

     
     

    "Final Review Juror." Pratt Institute Graduate Program of Architecture,

     
     

    Session Chair and Paper Referee.  "Design, Science and the Social History of Architecture." ACSA National Conference, Chicago. (2005)

     
     

    "Juror, University of Houston Fourth Year Design Studio Review." (Fall 2004)

     
     

    Reviewer of papers.  "Technology and Architecture." ACSA National Conference,

     
     

    "Invited Juror." Columbia University, New York. (Spring 2003)

     
     Panelist
     

    "Figurations, Presenation at Book Lanch for Pamphet 30." (January 2011)

     
     

    "Respondent to Antoine Picon, Rice School of Architecutre." (March 2011)

     
     

    "Thesis and Final Review." University of Pennsylvania School of Design, (May, 2008)

     
     Session Chair
     

    Conference Topic Chair and Moderator, Genetic Systems and Non-Standard Modes of (Re)Production,” ACSA 101st Annual Conference: New Constellations, New Ecologies, 21-24 March 2013.


     
     Conference Session Moderator, ACAIDIA 2008: Biological Processes and Computation, October, 2008.
     
     

    "Techniques and Technologies in Morphogenetic Design Symposium." Architectural Association, l. (March 2006)

     
     

    "Constructing History: Art, Science and Design in 20th century Architecture." ACSA National Annual Conference, Chicago. (March 2005)

     
    Editorial Positions
     Member of the Editorial Board, Haecceity: online journal of architectural culture. (2011 - 2011)

     Other, 2011 ACSA National Conference paper. (2011 - 2011)

     Other, Routledge Press. (2011 - 2014)

     Other, Lawrence King Publishers. (2011 - 2011)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Cite. Rice Design Alliance. (2011 - 2011)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Haecceity. (2007 - 2007)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Haecceity. (2008 - 2008)

     Series Editor, Architecture At Rice. Princeton Architectural Press. (2003 - 2003)

     Member of the Editorial Board, tbd. (2003 - 2003)

     Series Editor, Architecture At Rice. (2008 - 2008)

     Series Editor, Architecture At Rice. (2007 - 2007)

     Editor for Special Issue, Architecture and Design. (2007 - 2007)

    Supervised Theses & Dissertations
     Brent Linden, Masters of Architecture As Found? Light-Shape-Situation (Best thesis award). (2004) (Committee Member)

     Marc Frohm, Masters of Architecture Impresario of Change. (2004) (Committee Member)

     John Bacus, Masters of Architecture Data-Structures (Best thesis award). (2004) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Anne Buttyan, Masters of Architecture Play-back: surveilance and the metropolis. (2004) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Sharen Bidaise, M.Arch The Knowledge Commons. (2005) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Michael Martinez, M.Arch Border Crossing. (2005) (Committee Member)

     Andrea Dietz, M.Arch By the side of the Road. (2005) (Committee Member)

     Brent Armstrong, Branding Architecture. (2005) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Matt Radune, M.Arch Greening the master planned community. (2005) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Christine Youngblood, M.Arch Digital Space/Physical Place: Systems for Community Growth. (2006) (Committee Member)

     Joseph Kellner, M.Arch Entrepot 69: NAFTA/Transtexas corridor interchange urbanism. (2006) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Chris Lee, DMA Interiors for orchestra. (2006) (Committee Member)

     Judson Moore, M.Arch Implement: Interface Architecture for the phyopharmacological industry. (2006) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Dave Newton, M.Arch Performative Ecologies: Catalyzing New Programmatic Potentials at the Edge of the Urban Field. (2006) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Michael Robinson, M.Arch Feild of Edges: habitat and ecological systems in urban environments. (2006) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Cathlyn Newell, M.Arch Site Amplifcation: lattice for energy faming in the Gulf. (2006) (Committee Member)

     Natalia Beard, M.Arch Alluvial Landscapes for the redevelopment of New Orleans. (2007) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Julia Mandell, M.Arch Slow Waters: a floating ecotourism camp in the Atchafalaya basin. (2008) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Paul Morel, M.Arch House in Motion: responsive environments for the multitude. (2008) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Alberto Govela , March Heaven or Las Vegas: Themed environments of eco-catastrophe. (2010) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     David Dewane, MArch Commons Knowledge: A Library for Rare Books yet to be Written. (2010) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Matthew Nelson, DMA Morton Feldman’s Clarinet Works. (2010) (Committee Member)

     Sue Bilosi, MArch Towards a Greater [W]hole. (2011) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Sara Hieb, MArch Data Center In the Rural Landscape. (2011) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Maria Batista, MArch Diplomatic Agency. (2013) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Emily Glass, MArch Arctic Aerotropolis. (2014) (Thesis or Dissertation Director)

     Susanna Hohmann, M.Arch Felt: a material logic. (Committee Member)

    Awards, Prizes, & Fellowships
     Charles Duncan Award, Rice University (May, 2011)

     Outstanding Faculty Associate, Jones College, Rice University (April, 2008)

     Distinguished Associate for Jones College, (2007)

     Distinguished Faculty Associate, Jones College, Rice University (April 2006)

     Distinguished Faculty Associate, (2005)

     Distinguished Faculty Associate, Jones College, Rice University (April 2004)

     Brown Teaching Grant, Rice University (2003)

    Juries
     Jury
     Final Reviews, Californian College of the Arts. , San Francisco. (December 2010)
     Final Reviews, Columbia University. , New York. (2003)
     Final Reviews, Fourth Year Design Studio, University of Houston. (December, 2004)
     Final Reviews, Option Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design, Winter 2013.
     Final Reviews, Second Year Core Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design, Spring 2012.
     Final Reviews, Second Year Core Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design, Spring 2013.
     Final Reviews, option and second year core architecture studios, University of Pennsylvania School of Design, Winter 2012.
     MId Reviews, Yale University. , New Haven. (March 2010)